You’re a New Leader!

Congratulations! Welcome to the challenges and opportunities, joys, and satisfactions that will be yours as a Cub Scout leader, guiding and influencing the lives of boys. Buy making the commitment to serve as a leader, you have joined the ranks of more than 500,000 adult leaders in 52, 000 packs around the country who are giving time, ability, enthusiasm, and energy to build a better future for our nation. As you give leadership in Cub Scouting, you help enrich the lives of boys and make a difference in the kind of men they will become. An exciting and rewarding experience lies ahead of you

Fast Start training is designed to help get you started as a successful leader. The Cub Scout Fast Start Viewer Guide, along with the videotape for your position, will help you plan your first meeting by showing you what a meeting looks like and by explaining how it is designed. If you want, you may even use the meeting you see in the video as your first meeting. The Viewer Guide section for your position will show you how. Fast Start Training will also tell you about resources that are available to help you understand where you fit in the pack organization.

Fast Start is a beginning. It is not designed to answer all your questions about Cub Scouting and your volunteer position. As a new leader, your primary goal is to provide the best possible program for your boys. To help you accomplish this goal, the Boy Scouts of America provides continuing opportunities for you to learn about your role and to develop your skills. Fast Start is the first step. Your next step is Cub Scout leader Basic Training. Check with your pack leadership for more information on participating in basic training.

For a wealth of theme-related program ides for den and pack leaders, you will want to take part in your district’s monthly Cub Scout roundtable. Again, check with you Pack leadership for details about where and when roundtables are held.

Good luck, and welcome to the wonderful world of Cub Scouting!

What is Cub Scouting?
The purpose of the Boy Scouts of America, as incorporated on February 8, 1910, and chartered by Congress in 1916, is to provide for boys and young adults an effective education program designed to build desirable qualities of moral strength and character, to develop fitness, and to train in the responsibilities of active citizenship.

Since 1930, younger boys have had the opportunity to the Cub Scouts in a year-round, home-centered program that helps to strengthen the family. Cub Scouting (which includes Tiger Cubs, Cub Scouts, and Webelos Scouts) is the largest of the BSA’s program phases. The other phases are Boy Scouting (which includes Varsity Scouting) and Venturing (which includes career development through Exploring and Sea Exploring)

Purposes of Cub Scouting
Cub Scout pack serves boys who are in first through fifth grade (or 7 through 10 years of age). Boys, families, leaders and chartered organizations work together to achieve the following objectives:
Influencing the development of character and encouraging spiritual growth
Developing habits and attitudes of good citizenship
Encouraging good sportsmanship and pride in growing strong in mind and body
Improving understanding within the family
Strengthening the ability to get along with other boys and to respect other people
Fostering a sense of personal achievement by developing new interests and skills
Showing how to be helpful and to do one’s best
Providing fun and exciting new things to do
Preparing them to become Boy Scouts

The Pack
The Cub Scout pack provides three membership levels as a part of the pack program. Each level is designed to meet the developmental needs and characteristics of the boys of that age or grade in school.
Tiger Cubs BSA is for boys who are in the first grade (or are 7 years of age) and their adult partners. Boys and adults are members of a Tiger Cub den the usually meets twice a month for activities built around the Tiger Cub motto “Search, Discover, Share.” All of the adult partners share in the leadership of the den, with the guidance and support of the Tiger Cub coach. Tiger Cub dens may also take part in monthly pack meetings and other activities. Tiger Cub den activities are based on one of the seventeen big ideas listed in the Tiger Cubs BSA Family Activity Book.
Cub Scouting is for boys in the second and third grades (or 8 or 9 years old). When a boy becomes a Cub Scout, he is assigned to a Cub Scout den. Den meetings are generally held each week under the supervision of an adult volunteer den leader, usually a parent of one of the boys in the den. There might also be an assistant den leader and a den chief (an older Boy Scout, Varsity Scout, or Venturer) helping the den leader. All adult family members are expected to help when called upon to assist with den activities. At den meetings, the boys enjoy games, stunts, songs, crafts, and ceremonies. Many of these activities are based on a theme for that month such as “Under the Big Top” a circus theme. Dens also take part in field trips, service projects,and outdoor activities.
Webelos Scouting is for boys in the fourth and fifth grade (or 10 years old). These boys are members of a Webelos den. Their den meetings are also held weekly, usually in the evening or on a weekend. Instead of a monthly theme, the Webelos den program is built around one of the Webelos activity badges. Outdoor activities, including parent-son overnight camping, are also an important part of the den’s program
The Pack Meeting

Once each month, all den families gather for a pack meeting under the direction of the Cubmaster and pack committee. The pack meeting is the climax of the month’s den meetings and activities. It gives the dens something to look forward to and work toward. It gets all family members involved in activities with the boys. It is an opportunity to provide reccognition for boys, adult family members, and leaders. It gives the boys a chance to “show off” things they have learned during the month. Pack meeting activities are planned around the Cub Scout monthly theme and Webelos activity badge for the month. Pack meetings are fun for the whole family. (You will find more information on the pack meeting in the Cub Scout Leader Book)

Advancement and Recognition

Tiger Cubs receive recognition for their participation in the various activities related to the monthly big idea, both as a part of their den and also with their adult partner and family. Recognitions include the Tiger Tracks iron-ons, the Tiger Cub wall chart and stickers, and the Tiger Cub belt totem and beads. Because of their age and developmental level, Tiger Cubs do not have a formal advancement program.
Cub Scouts and Webelos Scouts have a plan of advancement in which a boy learns by doing. All boys, regardless of age, earn the Bobcat badge first by learning the Cub Scout Promise, Law of the Pack, handshake, salute, sign, motto, and meaning of “Webelos.” After he receives the Bobcat badge, the boy works on requirements based on his grade. Sometimes advancement requirements are started in den meeting, then completed at home with the help of family members. Parent involvement is a vital part of the advancement plan for Cub Scouts.
A Cub Scout who is in second grade works on twelve achievements to earn the Wolf badge. A boy who is in the third grade earns the Bear badge by completing twelve achievements selected from twenty-four subjects.
When a boy is in the fourth of fifth grade, he becomes a member of a Webelos den, and works on requirements for the Webelos badge, activity badges, and the Arrow of Light Award (the highest award in Cub Scouting) which prepares him for Boy Scouting.
This system of recognition for learning new things and doing his best is a step toward self-reliance and motivates a boy to achieve. (See the Cub Scout Leader Book for more information on advancement.)
Webelos Scout to Boy Scout

When a boy earns the Arrow of Light Award (or reaches 11 years of age, or completes fifth grade) he may graduate from a Cub Scout pack in to a Boy Scout troop. An impressive graduation ceremony is conducted jointly by the Cubmaster, Webelos den leader, and Scoutmaster at a pack meeting. One of the purposes of Cub Scouting is to graduate every boy into Boy Scouting.

Key Information

Your Unit Commissioner or Cubmaster will help you fill in the following information:

I am a leader in Pack No.
Our chartered organization is
Our pack is part of _______________________________ District.
Our district is part of ____________________________ Council.
Pack meetings are held at ___________ on the ______________________________ every month.
Pack leader planning meetings are held at ____________________ on the _____________ every month.
Cub Scout leader roundtable meets at _________________ on __________________every month.
Den Leader Coach __________________________________________________________
Phone __________________________________________________________
Cubmaster ___________________________________________________________
Phone __________________________________________________________
Committee Chairman__________________________________________________________
Phone __________________________________________________________
Unit Commissioner __________________________________________________________
Phone __________________________________________________________

The next basic training session is
__________________________________________________________________________
Date Time Place

Uniforms and literature may be obtained from the local Scouting distributor.

__________________________________________________________________________Name

__________________________________________________________________________
Address
Resources

Den and Pack Literature Resources

The following are available through your local council service center or Scouting distributor. For credit card orders, call toll-free 1-800-323-0732.

Cub Scout and Webelos Scout Program Helps. This booklet contains program ideas for twelve months of den and pack meetings (also included in bimonthly issues of Scouting magazine).

Cub Scout Leader Book. This basic manual covers all aspects of effective Cub Scout leadership.

Cub Scout Leader How-To-Book. This book contains hundreds of ideas for games, crafts, skit, stunts, projects and other activities for dens and packs. Also includes the Cub Scouts Ethics in Action program.

Tiger Cub Family Activity Book. This is a book for all Tiger Cub adults. The book contains recommended family and den activities for the seventeen Tiger Cub big ides.

Tiger Cub Resource Book. Tiger Cub dens will find this book helpful for program suggestions for Tiger Cub den meetings and activities.

Webelos Den Activities. For Webelos leaders, this book contains exciting projects for all twenty Webelos activity badges.

Boys Books

Wolf Cub Scout Book. Second-grade Cub Scouts use this book.

Bear Cub Scout Book. This book is for third-grade Cub Scouts

Webelos Scout Book. Fourth and Fifth grade Webelos Scouts use this book.

Fast Start Materials

Fast Start videotapes and viewer guides may be ordered from your local council service center or directly from Audiovisual Service, Boy Scouts of America, 1325 West Walnut Hill Lane, P.O. Box 152079, Irving, TX 75015-2079

Cub Scout Leader Fast Start Viewer Guide (one copy contained in each videotape)
The New Cub Scout Den Leader Videotape
The New Webelos Den Leader Videotape
The Pack Committee Videotape
The New Tiger Cub Group Coach Videotape
All Five Cub Scout programs on one tape.
The New Cub Scout Den Leader

Congratulations on becoming a new den leader. This position, in which you will be directly influencing the lives of boys, will be extremely rewarding for you and the boys in your den. This Cub Scout Fast Start Viewer Guide and video will help you conduct your first den meeting and let you know where you can get additional help.

Study this Viewer Guide carefully and view The New Den Leader video to help you understand and carry out your responsibilities as a den leader. (An experienced Cub Scout leader may be helping you with this Fast Start training, and this person will be glad to answer your question.)

In the video you will observe:
How a den meeting is conducted.
The parts of a den meeting
Activities for the den meeting
Who helps the den leader conduct the meeting
What Cub Scout literature is used in planning den meetings
Some additional responsibilities of the den leader

Your First Den Meeting

Your first den meeting will be held at a time and place selected by you. Den meetings are usually held once a week in the afternoon after school, in the early evening, or on a weekend day. The meeting place and time should be the same each week to avoid confusion. Den meetings last about an hour. You can share the responsibilities with your assistant den leader and a den chief (A Boy Scout, Varsity Scout, or Venturer) who has been selected to help your den.

Den meetings are built around a monthly theme chosen by the pack. All Cub Scout dens in the pack. All Cub Scout dens in the pack follow the same theme, which is also featured at the monthly pack meeting. Most packs use the themes outline in the Cub Scout and Webelos Scout Program Helps. The following meeting, which is also shown in the video, is based on the theme “Under the Big Top,” a circus theme that is a favorite of the boys.

Several days before the meeting, you should meet with you assistant den leader to plan the meeting, based on the suggested meeting ideas in the program helps. You will also want to contact your den chief to suggest games, tricks, and skills he will lead at the meeting.

Before the MeetingMeet with your assistant and den chief to make sure all equipment is ready. Put up a blank Code of Conduct poster, which the boys will help fill in at the meeting.

As Cub Scouts GatherThe den chief teaches the “Floating Ball” trick. Holding a table tennis ball over the end of a soda straw, tip your head back, and blow hard. Release the ball. It will stay suspended above the straw as long as you keep blowing. The den chief shows first boys as they arrive. He helps them to teach the next arrivals. Meanwhile, the den leader and assistant collect dues and check advancement requirements the boys have completed at home with their parents.

OpeningForm the den into a horseshoe formation, Have the den chief lead the Pledge of Allegiance. Teach the boys to sing “Tarzan of the Apes” (tune: Battle Hymn of the Republic)

I like bananas, coconuts, and grapes
I like bananas, coconuts, and grapes
I like bananas, coconuts, and grapes
That’s why they call me TARZAN OF THE APES (SHOUTED).

Business ItemsDiscuss the “under the Big Top” theme and the den’s part in the midway at the pack meeting. Boys may want to be the “strong man” by making a set of weights out of cardboard and pretending they are heavy. Show the boys how to perform the “Lion Tamer” act. (Props: hula-hoop covered with crepe paper flames; crepe paper “whip”) Let the boys take turns being lions or the lion tamer, the Great Cubini. The lions jump through hoops, walk on hind legs, roll over, etc., while the Great Cubini gives command.

Lead the boys in developing a den Code of Conduct, rules to be followed at den meetings and activities. Fill in chart prepared before the meeting and post this chart at each den meeting.

Elect a denner and assistant denner. The denner is a den member who helps you for the next month. The assistant denner helps the denner, then becomes the denner for the next month.

Recognize Cub Scouts who have completed Bobcat requirements or achievements.

ActivityClown Volleyball. Tie a string across the room (or go outside if weather permits) about 6 feet above the floor. Divide the den into two teams and give each team an inflated balloon “Volleyball” Both balls are put into play at the same time. Play as in regular volleyball. J Play ends when both balls are “grounded” (Also in the Cub Scout leader How-To Book
ClosingClosing is a time for a quiet thought or simple ceremony involving all the boys. Try a “living circle,” found in the Cub Scout Leader Book. Den and leaders stand in a close circle facing inward. Leader might say, “It is fun playing circus performers because they are cheerful. They spread their happiness to others. Cub Scouts do that, too, when they have a cheerful attitude about the things they do.” Have everyone turn right and expend their left hand into the middle of the circle, palm downward. Each person grasps the extended thumb of the person to his left, forming a complete living circle of left hands. At the same time, the right hand is held high in the Cub Scout sign. Say together, “Ah-Kay-La, we’ll do our best,” with left hand going up and down on each syllable
After the MeetingThe denner and assistant may stay afterward to help clean up, along with the den chief, assistant den leader, and den leader. Review plans for next week’s meeting. Congratulate them and yourself on completing your first well-planned, successful den meeting

Getting Started

You will receive Scouting magazine approximately every two months as part of your registration. Scouting magazine includes Cub Scout Program Helps and other information to aid you as a leader. Ask your Cubmaster to furnish you with a copy of the current Cub Scout Program Helps to use until your subscription begins.

Obtain (or borrow temporarily) the Cub Scout leader Book and begin reading it. This book describes your role as a den leader and will give you additional information.
Study the responsibilities of a den leader as listed in the Cub Scout Leader Book. You have made an important commitment and these will explain what is expected.
Cub Scout Program Helps contains suggested den meeting outlines. Plan your first month’s den meetings. Remember that the key to successful den program planning is KISMIF (keep it simple, make it fun).
Get acquainted with the adult members of your den families. Getting to know den families will aid you in helping them get the most from Cub Scouting
Get to know the boys in your den. Establish a den code of conduct so they will know what you expect of them. (See the Cub Scout Leader Book for more on code of conduct.)
Ask you Cubmaster to help secure a den chief or den aide for your den. This youth leader will be of assistance in running den meetings
Obtain and begin wearing the den leader’s uniform as soon as possible. It is attractive, comfortable, and suitable for all Cub Scouts meetings and activities. Wearing the uniform properly helps to set a good example for the boys.
8. Now that you have completed your first den meeting, you will want to learn more about your position and get new ideas for den meetings. Plan to attend the next Cub Scout roundtable, a monthly meeting of adult leaders from packs in your area. You can get advice and great suggestions on themes and activities at the roundtable.
Take part in Cub Scout Leader Basic Training as soon as possible. This will expand on your add to the information you receive in Fast Start training. Every boy deserves trained and qualified leaders.

You are now on your way to becoming an informed and successful den leader. Don’t hesitate to ask
for help. There are many people who want to assist you in providing the finest possible Cub Scout
experience for the boys in your den.

All leaders bring to Cub Scouting their own talents and skills, their own backgrounds and interests.
Your key to becoming an effective leader is to use your own abilities and interests, along with what you learn in training to plan and conduct the best possible program for the boys. What happens in the life of each boy during his formative years will determine to a great extent the kind of man he will become. What a tremendous opportunity and challenge for you, the den leader!

The New Webelos Den Leader

Congratulations on becoming a new Webelos den leader. This position, in which you will be directly influencing the lives of young people, will be extremely rewarding for you and the boys in your Webelos den. This Viewer Guide and video will help you conduct your first Webelos den meeting and let you know where you can get additional help.

Study this Viewer Guide carefully and view The New Webelos Den Leader Video. These should help you understand and carry out your responsibilities as a Webelos den leader. (An experienced Cub Scout leader may be helping you with this Fast Start training, and this person will be glad to answer your questions.)

In the video you will observe:
How a Webelos den meeting is conducted.
The parts of a Webelos den meeting
Activities for the Webelos den meeting
Who helps the den leader conduct the meeting
Your role as a Webelo den leader
What Cub Scout literature is used in planning a Webelo den meeting
Some additional responsibilities of the Webelo den leader

Your First Den Meeting

Webelos den meetings are usually held in the evening or on weekends, once each week. The meeting day and time are set by the Webelos den leader. It should be the same time and place each week to prevent confusion. Den meetings last approximately one hour. Leadership responsibilities are shared by the Webelos den leader, assistant den leader, and den chief.

Webelos den meetings are built around one of the twenty Webelos activity badges in the Webelos Scout Book. Suggested den meeting outlines for each of the activity badges may be found in the Webelos section of the Cub Scout and Webelos Scout Program Helps, your most important planning tool. The following meeting, which is also shown in the video, is based on the Showman activity badge.

Several days before the meeting, you should meet with you assistant Webelos den leader to plan the meeting, based on the suggested meeting ideas in the program helps. You will also want to contact your den chief to suggest games, tricks, and skills he will lead at the meeting.


Before the MeetingMeet with your assistant and den chief to make sure all equipment is ready. Put up a blank Code of Conduct poster, which the boys will help fill in at the meeting.

As Cub Scouts GatherThe den chief teaches the “Throwing a Knot” trick. In advance, he ties an overhand knot in the corner of a neckerchief, then holds the neckerchief with the knot concealed in his hand and the rest of the neckerchief hanging loose. He explains that he can sometimes “throw” a knot into the loose corner of a neckerchief. He lifts the loose corner with his left hand and places it between the thumb and first finger of his right hand then snaps it out. After a couple of unsuccessful tries, he
switches the corners in his hand and the knot appears on the next snap. (See the video demonstration or the Cub Scout Magic book.) The den chief shows the first boys this trick as they arrive, and helps them teach the trick to the next arrivals. Meanwhile, the den leader and assistant collect dues

OpeningForm the den into a horseshoe formation. The den chief lads them in the Cub Scout Promise.

Activity Badge FunIntroduce the Showman activity badge, and review the puppetry requirements for the badge from the Webelos Scout Book. Introduce the visiting activity badge counselor, perhaps a parent of one of the boys in the den, who will teach puppetry. Develop a puppet skit to be presented at the pack meeting, and have each boy make a puppet to be used in the skit. Practice using the puppets.

PreparationUse a large cardboard box as the basis for a puppet theater for the pack meeting skit. Help boys develop a design and plans for decorating the stage
Lead the boys in developing a Code of Conduct – rules to be followed at den meetings and activities. Fill in the chart prepared before the meeting and post the chart at each den meeting.
Elect a denner and assistant denner. The denner is a den member who helps lead the den and assists you for the next month. The assistant denner helps the denner, then becomes the denner for the following month.
Recognize Webelos Scouts who have completed Bobcat requirements (new boys) or activity badge requirements.
Go outside and practice throwing the flying disc for the sport Ultimate.


ClosingLead the den in a brief reflecting experience. Ask how having fun with Showman skills and a circus theme might relate to Scouting. Look for fun, cheerfulness with others as key points.
Have the den form a circle for the closing ceremony. Repeat the Scout Benediction: “And now, may the Great Master of all Scouts be with us until we meet again.”
After the MeetingThe denner and assistant may stay afterward to help clean up, along with the den chief, assistant Webelos leader, and Webelo leader. Review plans for next week’s meeting. Congratulate them and yourself on completing your first well-planned, successful den meeting
Webelos Outdoor Program

Webelos dens are encouraged to have several supervised overnight camping experiences with parents. These campouts help build a strong relationship between the boy, the parent, and the den. Day camp and resident camp programs are conducted for Webelos Scouts/parents by local councils

You will receive Scouting magazine approximately every two months as part of your registration. Scouting magazine includes Cub Scout Program Helps and other information to aid you as a leader. Ask your Cubmaster to furnish you with a copy of the current Cub Scout Program Helps to use until your subscription begins.



Obtain (or borrow temporarily) the Cub Scout Leader Book and begin reading it. This book describes your role as a Webelos den leader and will give you additional information.
Study the responsibilities of a Webelos den leader listed in the Cub Scout Leader Book. You have made an important commitment and these will explain what is expected of you.
Get acquainted with your Cubmaster, who will see that you have the information and material you need to start off on the right foot.
With the help of your Cubmaster, plan your first month’s Webelos den meetings. Webelos Scout Program Helps contains suggested den meeting outlines. Remember that the key to successful den program planning is KISMIF (Keep it simple, Make it Fun)
Get acquainted with the adult members of your den families. Getting to know den families will aid you in helping them get the most from Webelos Scouting.
Get acquainted with your assistant Webelos den leader. If there is none, you may want to enlist the help of one of the adult family members in the den. This person will share responsibilities with you.
Get to know the boys in your den. Establish a den code of conduct so they will know what you expect of them. (See the Cub Scout Leader Book for more on code of conduct.)
Ask you Cubmaster to help secure a den chief or den aide for your den. This youth leader will be of assistance in running den meetings
Obtain and begin wearing the Webelos den leader’s uniform as soon as possible. It is attractive, comfortable, and suitable for all Cub Scouts meetings and activities. Wearing the uniform properly helps to set a good example for the boys.
Now that you have completed your first den meeting, you will want to learn more about your position and get new ideas for den meetings. Plan to attend the next Cub Scout roundtable, a monthly meeting of adult leaders from packs in your area. You can get advice and great suggestions on themes and activities at the roundtable.
Take part in Cub Scout Leader Basic Training as soon as possible. This will expand on your add to the information you receive in Fast Start training. Every boy deserves trained and qualified leaders.

You are now well on your way to becoming an informed and successful Webelos den leader. Don’t hesitate to ask for help. There are many people who want to assist you in providing the finest possible Cub Scout experience for the boys in the den.

All leaders bring to Cub Scouting their own talents and skills, their own backgrounds and interests. Your key to becoming an effective leader is to use your own abilities and interest, along with what you learn in training, to plan and conduct the best possible program for the boys. What happens in the life of each boy during his formative years will determine to a great extent the kind of man he will become. What a tremendous opportunity and challenge for you, The Webelos Den Leader!

The New Cubmaster

Congratulation on becoming a new Cubmaster. This position, in which you will be directly influencing the lives of young people, will be extremely rewarding for you and the boys in your pack.

This Viewer Guide and video will help you conduct your first pack meeting and let you know where you can get further help.

Study this Viewer Guide carefully and view The New Cubmaster Video. These should help you understand and carry out your responsibilities as a Cubmaster. (An experienced Cub Scout leader may be helping you with this Fast Start Training, and this person will be glad to answer your question.)

In the video, you will observe:

The structure of a pack meeting
The purposes of a pack meeting
Cub Scout literature contributing to the successful conduct of a pack meeting
The role of other volunteers (den leaders, Webelos den leaders) in conducting a pack meeting
The role of the Cubmaster in a pack meeting
The role of other volunteers (den leaders, Webelos den leaders) in Conducting a pack meeting
The role of the Cubmaster in a pack meeting
How to conduct a successful Pack meeting

Your First Pack Meeting

The Cubmaster, with the pack committee, ensures that each month of the year there is a pack meeting (or special pack activity) that is enjoyed by Cub Scout families and provides an opportunity for recognition.

Pack meetings are usually held in the location of the chartered organization once each month. The meeting day and time is set by the pack committee. It should be the same time and place each month to prevent confusion Pack meetings are led by the Cubmaster and last approximately one and half-hours. All dens and their families attend pack meeting.

Pack meetings are built around a monthly theme chosen by the pack. All Cub Scout dens in the
Pack follow the same monthly theme for their weekly den meetings, while the Webelos den meetings concentrate on one of the Webelos activity badges. Most packs use these outlined in the Cub Scout and Webelos Scout Program Helps. The following meeting, which is also shown in the video, is based on the theme “Under the Bog Top,” a circus theme that is a favorite of the boys.

Plans for the pack meeting are usually make at the pack leaders’ meeting, and responsibilities are assigned at that time. Work with your pack committee in finalizing plans for this pack meeting and in developing plans for next month’s pack meeting. Use the pack meeting planning sheet found in the Cub Scout Leader Book.


Before the MeetingIn setting up the meeting, make sure the following details are given special attention. Do not do everything yourself, delegate. Determine in advance who will do what and how each task will be done.
Room Arrangements
Unlock Doors
Turn on Lights
Open restrooms
Turn on heating or ventilation.
Set up chairs in den sections and mark
Properly display U.S. and pack flags
Set up tables for den exhibits and mark with den numbers
Set up table for advancement recognitions.
Materials and Equipment
Make sure badges and other awards are ready
Check on props and equipment for ceremonies, games, and the Preopening activity.
Other Things to Consider
Plan and set up the circus layout; main ring, midway, concessions, and decoration.
Coordinate den acts and sideshows, including Webelos den performances related to the Showman activity badge
Provide snacks from pack funds, or have a concession stand selling refreshments.
The Gathering PeriodGreeters. Use one of the dens to greet people as they arrive, and direct them to the midway area.
Den Exhibits. Set up tables in the midway area for dens to show off their projects.
Activity. In the midway area, families can see the strong man, snake charmer, etc. Also have games like Ring the Bottle, Skittles, and Bean-Bag Toss. You may want to have the concessions stand open.

The Main Part of the MeetingOpening Ceremony. Circus performers leave the main meeting room to form the parade. They parade back in to the tune of “When the Cub Scouts Go March In” (see Cub Scout Songbook). Recite the Pledge of Allegiance
Song. “The Circus Comes To Town” (see Cub Scout Songbook)
Welcome and Introductions. Ringmaster (Cubmaster) welcomes everybody and introduces special guests
Group Participation Stunt, “Animal Trainer.” Arrange cub Scouts in a circle. The Ringmaster stands in the center and names an action to be performed, for example, “Walk like an elephant,” “Growl like a lion,” or “Scratch the monkey.”
Den Stunts and Skits. (see the video) These include plate spinning, the lion tamer act, a Webelos puppet show, a clown high-dive act, and the clown water bucket toss.
Recognition Period. The following should be included:
Bobcat Induction Ceremony (see Staging Den and Pack Ceremonies)
Advancement, The ringmaster presents badges and Arrow Points to parents of eligible boys, who, in turn, present awards to their sons. Webelos leaders present activity badges and Webelos badges.

Game – Balloon Bust Relay. Line up den teams several feet in front of chairs, one chair per team. Give each person a balloon. On signal, the first person in each team starts blowing up his balloon. When it is inflated, he ties it off, runs to the chair, and sits on the balloon until it bursts. The next player then starts blowing up his balloon. The first team to burst all its balloons wins. (you can equalize den sizes by having some boys go twice in smaller dens.)

ClosingThe ringmaster calls, “Strike up the band!” All boys fall into line behind the Ringmaster and parade out of the room to the tune of “Good Night, Cub Scouts.” (See the Cub Scout Songbook)

After the MeetingThe cleanup committee and assigned dens handle cleaning up and putting the room back in order. The meeting room should be as clean as when you came in. Review the meeting. Evaluate how it went and what could be improved. Give yourself a pat on the back for leading a well-planned, exciting pack meeting.

Getting Started

You will receive Scouting magazine approximately every two months as part of your registration. Scouting magazine includes Cub Scout Program Helps and other information to aid you as a leader. Ask your Cubmaster to furnish you with a copy of the current Cub Scout Program Helps to use until your subscription begins.



Obtain (or borrow temporarily) the Cub Scout Leader Book and begin reading it. This book describes your role as a Webelos den leader and will give you additional information.
Study the responsibilities of a Webelos den leader listed in the Cub Scout Leader Book. You have made an important commitment and these will explain what is expected of you.
Get acquainted with the other leaders in your pack. You will need their help in carrying out a successful pack program. You will be working closely with the pack committee chairman and den leader coach.
Get acquainted with your unit commissioner. The commissioner is a friend to your pack and will be glad to answer questions and help a make your pack program successful.
Get acquainted with your district executive. This professional Scouter is employed by the council to coordinate Scouting in your district.
Attend the monthly leaders’ meetings held by your pack. You and the pack committee chairman share the responsibility of running these meetings. With the help of the pack committee, plan your first pack meeting. Cub Scout Program Helps contains a suggested pack meeting outline. Remember that the key to success is KISMIF (Keep it simple, Make it fun)
Plan to attend regularly the monthly district Cub Scout Leader roundtable. You will gain many good program ideas on the monthly theme and continuing help on pack administration. You will get acquainted with Cubmasters from other packs that will share ideas and experiences with you. (Your Unit Commissioner or district executive can tell you when and where the roundtable meets.)
Take part in Cub Scout leader Basic Training as soon as possible. It will expand on and add to the information you receive in Fast Start training and help you become a more effective leader. Every boy deserves trained and qualified leaders. (Your Unit Commissioner or District Executive can give you information about training.)
Obtain and begin wearing the den leader’s uniform as soon as possible. It is attractive, comfortable, and suitable for all Cub Scouts meetings and activities. Wearing the uniform properly helps to set a good example for the boys. Your unit commissioner or district executive can tell you where to obtain the uniform and insignia.
As soon as possible, establish a working relationship with a neighborhood Boy Scout troop and Scoutmaster. You will need their help in obtaining den chiefs and graduating Webelos Scouts into Boy Scouting.

Completing these steps will help you through your first few weeks leadership. You are now on your way to becoming an informed and successful Cubmaster. Don’t hesitate to ask for help. There are many people who want to assist you in providing the finest possible Cub Scout experience for the boy in your pack.
The Pack Committee

Congratulations on becoming a new pack committee member. This position – in which you will be directly influencing the lives of young people, will be extremely rewarding for you and the boys in your pack

The Viewer Guide and videotape will help you understand the functions of a pack committee and your responsibilities as a pack committee member, show you the resources that are available, and let you know where you can get further help.

Study this Viewer Guide carefully and view The Pack Organization video. These should help you understand and carry out your responsibilities as a pack committee member.

In the videotape, you will observe:
A pack leaders’ meeting contributing to the successful operation of a Cub Scout Pack
The functions of the pack committee
The role of the Cubmaster
The role of the Committee Chairman

Pack Committee

You were selected as a member of the pack committee because of your interest in and concern for boys. Regardless of the size of your pack committee, certain jobs must be performed if Cub Scouts are to receive the type of fun-filled and meaningful program, which they deserve. By making the commitment to serve as a leader, you share the following responsibilities with other members of the pack committee:

Select the best person available for Cubmaster and one or more assistant Cubmasters, with the approval of the chartered organization.
Provide adequate and safe facilities for pack meetings.
See that a year-round pack program is conducted according to the policies of the Boy Scouts of America.
Encourage all leaders and boys to have and properly use the uniforms, badges, and insignia.
Establish a good relationship with neighborhood Boy Scout troops. Try to graduate every Webelos Scout into a troop.
Assist with pack charter renewal, reregistering on time with the local council.
Establish a sound financial program with a pack budget plan and adequate financial records
Stimulate the interest of families through proper programming.
Work with the Cubmaster to conduct periodic training for adult family members, including an annual pack parents meeting.
Recognize pack leaders periodically to show them that their efforts are appreciated.

Individual pack committee positions include chairman, secretary, and treasurer, as well as committee members responsible for advancement, outings, training, public relations, membership and council financial support. The responsibilities for each position are described in detail in the Cub Scout Leader Book and are briefly highlighted in The Pack Committee video.

Your pack committee chairman or unit commissioner will be glad to explain any of these responsibilities that you do not understand.

Monthly Pack Leaders’ Meeting

The purpose of the monthly pack leaders’ meeting is to plan the next month’s den and pack programs and to manage the business affairs of the pack. All adult leaders in the pack attend this meeting.

Experience has shown that the monthly planning meeting for October, for instance, should come about a week before the September pack meeting, and so on through the year. This gives the leaders time to check on details for the coming pack meeting, in addition to planning for the next month. If recognitions for advancement are needed as a result of recent activities, the number of badges can be reported and obtained in time for the pack meeting.

What happens at a pack leaders’ meeting? Well, the agenda can be thought of as falling into three parts.

Part 1 – Den Plans
Cubmaster reviews next month’s theme and Webelos activity badges as well as dens’ participation in the pack meeting.
Den leader coaches report on roundtable suggestions for the theme and activity badges.
Webelos den leaders or the Webelos den leader coach reports on plans for next month.
General discussion is conducted with everyone present regarding next month’s den and pack meetings, including a review of the Cub Scout and Webelos Scout Program Helps.
Cub Scout den leaders and Webelos den leaders split into groups with their den leader coaches to discuss plans for next month’s den meetings and to share the concerns of leaders.

At this meeting, the den leaders use Den Meeting Program Sheets. Den leaders write in the activities agreed upon in general for each den meeting. They share ideas, try games and tricks, and see that everyone knows what to do. Skit ideas are discussed and dens decide on their part of the pack meeting. This prevents duplication.

Part 2 – Pack Plans
Groups assemble and confirm plans for next month’s pack meeting.
Tie up loose ends for this month’s pack meeting, and review assignments.
Den leaders turn in advancement reports to allow time to obtain awards for the next pack meeting.
Den leaders turn in den dues to the pack treasurer.
A Unit leadership Enhancement Discussion may be conducted to help leaders better understand topics such as advancement, youth protection, membership, parent involvement, etc.
The committee chairman reports on the needs of the pack, progress of the boys, and any problems that need to be addressed.

Part 3 – Friendly Social Time

This is a time to informally share adventures, successes, trips, or any other experiences that the leaders may have had with their dens. Refreshments may be served. Those who have to leave are free to go.

Approximately every other month, you will receive Scouting magazine, which contains helpful information to aid you as a leader. You should do these things:

Obtain (or borrow temporarily) the Cub Scout Leader Book and begin reading it. This book describes your role as a member of the pack committee. Study the sections on organization, leadership, policies, pack management, and pack relationships.
Study the responsibilities of a Pack Committee Member listed in the Cub Scout Leader Book. You have made an important commitment and these will explain what is expected of you.
Get acquainted with the other leaders in your pack. All leaders need to work together for a successful pack program.
Attend the monthly leaders’ meetings held by your pack. This is where pack plans are made.
Take part in Cub Scout leader Basic Training as soon as possible. It will expand on and add to the information you receive in Fast Start training and help you become a more effective leader. Every boy deserves trained and qualified leaders. Every boy deserves trained and qualified leaders.

Once you have completed these steps, you will be well on your way to becoming an informed and successful pack leader. Don’t hesitate to ask for help. There are many people who want to assist you.
The New Tiger Cub Coach

Congratulations on becoming a Tiger Cub coach. This position, in which you will be directly influencing the lives of boys and their adult partners, will be extremely rewarding for you.

Study this Viewer Guide carefully and view The New Tiger Cub coach video. These will help you understand and carry out your responsibilities as a Tiger Cub coach. (An experienced Cub Scout leader may be helping you with this Fast Start Training, and this person will be glad to answer your questions)

In the video, you will observe
Membership requirements for Tiger Cubs and their adult partners
The job of the Tiger Cub Coach
How to conduct the first gathering to organize a Tiger Cub den
How to conduct reregistration of Tiger Cub dens
How and when Tiger Cub dens participate in pack activities
Monthly report to the pack committee on Tiger Cub progress
Tiger Cub graduation into Cub Scouting

You, The Tiger Cub Coach

You were selected as a Tiger Cub coach and approved by the pack committee because of your interest in boys. By making the commitment to serve as den leader, you have agreed to carry out the following responsibilities:

Complete Tiger Cub Den Leader Fast Start training and basic training
Organize and provide orientation for Tiger Cub Dens.
Assist dens in selecting den coordinators.
Register Tiger Cubs and adult partners and collect few.
Conduct orientation for the den coordinators
Conduct big ideas 1 and 17 for the den
Offer ongoing support to the Tiger Cub dens
Coordinate Tiger Cub participation in pack activities during the year
Make regular reports to Cubmaster and pack committee on Tiger Cub den status
Serve as a resource person for the Tiger Cub dens
Work with the pack committee to reregister Tiger Cubs and their adult partners as a part of the pack’s annual charter renewal process.
Work with the Cubmaster to plan and conduct the graduation of Tiger Cubs to Cub Scouting


Organizing The Tiger Cub Den

Tiger Cubs BSA is a nine-month program. It is important that boys and their adult partners be enrolled as early as possible in the school year. This means that the major recruiting effort should be concentrated in September and October. Many councils recruit Tiger Cubs through a district or council School Night for Scouting or local Tiger Cub rally plan. Your committee chairman or Cubmaster can provide more information on this.

Your responsibility includes conducting the orientation of the new Tiger Cub den, using the Welcome to Tiger Cubs BSA video and Tiger Cub Family Activity Packet. This could be done as a part of the School Night or rally program, or it can be a separate organizational meeting. At the same time, the date and location of your first den meeting should be set. A suggested meeting format is below and in the Tiger Cub Guidebook


First Meeting

Before the first meeting, familiarize yourself with the Family Activity Packet, which you will distribute at the meeting. Also, go over the video presentation to be sure you understand everything.

This is the first impression of Tiger Cubs the boys and adults will receive, so keep your meeting short and causal. Stress the fun and excitement of the program, as shown in the video.

Following is a suggested format:
Call your den together (both boys and adults)
Present the video, giving out the Family Activity packet at the proper time.
Answer any question.
Plan the first meeting and explain your role
Have boys and adults complete membership applications, and collect fees.
Make a roster of boys’ adults’ addresses and phone numbers. Have them complete the roster in the front of the Tiger Cubs BSA Family Activity Book
Select one adult partner to serve as a den coordinator to communicate information with other adults in the den.

Assist the den in completing the calendar in the back of the Family Activity Book