Teaching KNOWLEDGE

Teaching KNOWLEDGE

KNOWLEDGE – Come into the room dressed in a cap and gown.  Introduce yourself a Nola Knowledge with a “K” (pronounce the K when saying it.)  I’m here to tell you that there is much knowledge to be gained by doing your personal progress.  Then read a poem or scripture on knowledge. 

(Handout – Fruit roll ups with a ribbon around it.  Tell them that as soon as they accomplish their goal they can eat their diploma!).

Tell the girls a story about a yw who didn’t have the opportunity to be in the kitchen much while she was growing up.  When she got married she remembered her mother talking about how she made cakes, cookies etc. from scratch.  She wanted to be a good wife so she decided to try making something from scratch.  She took out a cook book she received as a wedding present and proceeded to look for a recipe she could make from scratch.  Having found nothing, she decided to go to the grocery store and get some ingredients for scratch to make her husband a treat.  She talked to the grocer and asked
him if he had stuff to make something from scratch and he showed her to the
flour and sugar etc.  She wasn’t sure why he was showing her those items and
then asked him if he had some scratch.  With a puzzled look on his face he said
no and told her to go the store around the corner.  When she approached the store she thought it was odd that it was a feed store, but not thinking much about it she entered the store, and asked the clerk if he had scratch, he said yes how much to you need.  She said I
don’t know.  He asked her how many chickens she had, and she responded none, but I’ll take the 25# bag of scratch.  When she got home and took some scratch out of the bag, she was a little confused at the idea that this dry crumply stuff would make a cake.  Once
her husband returned home, she asked him to make something from scratch.  He
was happy to help her in the kitchen so he said why don’t we both go make something from scratch.  They went to the kitchen and she found herself watching him, and to her surprise found that he was using flour, sugar, eggs, etc. but not the scratch she had purchased.

The moral of the story is, with out being taught we don’t know things that are important.

We also do bulletin boards representing each value as the month’s theme. When we last had knowledge as our theme, I used the “hidden treasures of knowledge” scripture, (sorry I’m at work and can’t give you a reference). Anyway, my son helped me make a treasure chest that stood out about 1 1/2″ from the board. I used tiny volumes of the standard works that peeked out of the top. Also made gold and siver coins, pearl string etc. to fancy up the treasure chest. I also made little mock math, science, etc. books and glued
onto the board pencils, crayons, school things, scattered around. So world knowledge was a secondary theme, but the real treasures were the scriptures in the chest. Hope you can picture it. (It also helps to have an artistic son.)

value minute.—the value is knowledge
she first talked about the lessons for Sunday school so far this year, about the creation and Adam and Eve and how when they were in the garden they didn’t know good or evil and they didn’t even know what they were choosing by partaking of the forbidden fruit.  Then she talked about the dream Lehi had about the tree of life and how we all want to eat of the tree of life. She then went on to say that our whole reason for being here is to know that the Gospel is true and gain a testimony by gaining knowledge of things
pertaining to the gospel.  As a handout she gave a green apple.  It was very effective.
Hope this helps.

 Laura in MN

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